Love – It is what it is

Room is declutterized and looks about twice the size now. I should do this more often.

This morning the postman delivered 2 more cards in my mailbox. I had some time to photograph them and to add them to the gallery.

May I present you:

Imagine Love, Actually
Love and Bill, Actually
Love Actually, in a stitch
Love lifts us up
Love Davy Actually

I simply can’t tell you how big the smile on my face is, when I look at how creative you all have been. It is simply amazing and I love them all equally much, actually.

I am sitting here and wonder how on earth I have been able to convince you out there to send me fantastic cards like these, it is billiant (which is spelled correctly).

I am about to dive into the next short film meeting, but before I go, I want to cite a poem that was on one of the cards I received (and thank you so much for sending it!). I had never read it before but I absolutely love it, and it is one of those poems you wish you had written yourself. It is also a very true poem. It is by Erich Fried.

What it is

It is nonsense
says Reason
It is what it is
says Love

It is unhappiness
says Caution
it is nothing but pain
says Fear
It is hopeless
says Insight
It is what it is
says Love

It is ridiculous
says Pride
It is careless
says Caution
It is impossible
says Experience
It is what it is
says Love

Erich Fried

7 thoughts to “Love – It is what it is”

  1. Ingrid, I received the card yesterday afternoon! It’s fantastic and I have it displayed in my room. Thank you! I am still working on yours and hope to have it finished tomorrow.

    P.S. I watched Love Actually with a special someone this past week,
    P.S.S. Thanks for posting that poem. I needed to hear that.

  2. I think you’d enjoy tv here these past days – I’m watching way too many movies these days.

    That is a beautiful poem, Ingrid!!

  3. Are you really surprised to see so much creativity? You are our coach :-)

  4. The poem is wonderful – but this translation is rather poor and improper (e.g. both “Berechnung” and “Vorsicht” are translated as “Caution”). I’ve found several copies of it on the web – why don’t people read it first before they re-use it?

    Here is a far better version:
    http://adirondackreview.homestead.com/transfried.html

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